Talk:Pedal/Steering Interference

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Acronym

I favorise PSI instead of P/SI or PIS. As the unit "pounds per square inch" is written in lowercase letters "psi" there is not much risk of misinterpretation. --Jürgen 19:41, 5 January 2008 (CET)

PSI + Python

The python, if designed correctly has no noticeable PSI, as well as the other center-steered recumbents, like flevobike, airbike and chinkara. Tom-Traylor-like recumbents have noticeable PSI and they need handlebars to counteract this unwanted force. --Jürgen 19:44, 5 January 2008 (CET)

PSI is not a problem on neither a python nor a flevo. Apart from the tom traylor type of bikes, the other bikes probably have no problems either. PSI is only a few mm's wiggle at end of the BB. This is certainly not something I would call a problem, an upright has the same wiggle! The text should be changed to reflect that PSI is a non-issue. What I disagree is that the python would be actually _better_ then a flevo on this point. Babypython 15:09, 7 January 2008 (CET)
Hoi Dirk, I agree with you. PSI is really not an issue. It comes into play when the steering pivot is moved towards the front (TT-clones). Flevobike and Airbike are even less prone to PSI than the Python which may be a result of the smaller pivot angle. --Jürgen 20:09, 7 January 2008 (CET)
Edited the page and reduced the "severeness level". MBB? yet another acronym to document... What do you think of the picture illustrating the forces? --DirkS 19:56, 30 January 2008 (CET)
The picture helps a lot in understanding the nature of PSI. What it doesn't show is the influence of the pivot angle. --Jürgen 15:32, 31 January 2008 (CET)
I think the article is already very good! good job! Babypython 12:56, 22 February 2008 (CET)

I can't see why the bike on the picture should have noticeable PSI. The steering pivot is behind the rider. The pedal forces are the forces from his legs on the pedals reacted on the seat; all in the solid structure of the front of the bike. When the pedal forces do not work around the steering axis, there can not be any PSI. User:Rik Mars 2010 March 29